Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/84686
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dc.contributor.authorChénard, Carolineen
dc.contributor.authorWirth, Jennifer F.en
dc.contributor.authorSuttle, Curtis A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-21T04:26:07Zen
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-06T15:49:30Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-21T04:26:07Zen
dc.date.available2019-12-06T15:49:30Z-
dc.date.issued2016en
dc.identifier.citationChénard, C., Wirth, J. F., & Suttle, C. A. (2016). Viruses Infecting a Freshwater Filamentous Cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp.) Encode a Functional CRISPR Array and a Proteobacterial DNA Polymerase B. mBio, 7(3), e00667-16-.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10356/84686-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10220/41912en
dc.description.abstractHere we present the first genomic characterization of viruses infecting Nostoc, a genus of ecologically important cyanobacteria that are widespread in freshwater. Cyanophages A-1 and N-1 were isolated in the 1970s and infect Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7210 but remained genomically uncharacterized. Their 68,304- and 64,960-bp genomes are strikingly different from those of other sequenced cyanophages. Many putative genes that code for proteins with known functions are similar to those found in filamentous cyanobacteria, showing a long evolutionary history in their host. Cyanophage N-1 encodes a CRISPR array that is transcribed during infection and is similar to the DR5 family of CRISPRs commonly found in cyanobacteria. The presence of a host-related CRISPR array in a cyanophage suggests that the phage can transfer the CRISPR among related cyanobacteria and thereby provide resistance to infection with competing phages. Both viruses also encode a distinct DNA polymerase B that is closely related to those found in plasmids of Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7424, Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, and Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. These polymerases form a distinct evolutionary group that is more closely related to DNA polymerases of proteobacteria than to those of other viruses. This suggests that the polymerase was acquired from a proteobacterium by an ancestral virus and transferred to the cyanobacterial plasmid. Many other open reading frames are similar to a prophage-like element in the genome of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7524. The Nostoc cyanophages reveal a history of gene transfers between filamentous cyanobacteria and their viruses that have helped to forge the evolutionary trajectory of this previously unrecognized group of phages.en
dc.format.extent11 p.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesmBioen
dc.rights© 2016 Chénard et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.en
dc.subjectfilamentous cyanobacteriaen
dc.subjectCRISPR arrayen
dc.titleViruses Infecting a Freshwater Filamentous Cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp.) Encode a Functional CRISPR Array and a Proteobacterial DNA Polymerase Ben
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.organizationSingapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineeringen
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/mBio.00667-16en
dc.description.versionPublished versionen
item.grantfulltextopen-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
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