Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/84989
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dc.contributor.authorDe Pisapia, Nicolaen
dc.contributor.authorSerra, Mauroen
dc.contributor.authorRigo, Paolaen
dc.contributor.authorJager, Justinen
dc.contributor.authorPapinutto, Nicoen
dc.contributor.authorEsposito, Gianlucaen
dc.contributor.authorVenuti, Paolaen
dc.contributor.authorBornstein, Marc H.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-17T08:38:40Zen
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-06T15:54:59Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-17T08:38:40Zen
dc.date.available2019-12-06T15:54:59Z-
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.citationDe Pisapia, N., Serra, M., Rigo, P., Jager, J., Papinutto, N., Esposito, G., et al. (2014). Interpersonal Competence in Young Adulthood and Right Laterality in White Matter. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 26(6), 1257-1265.en
dc.identifier.issn0898-929Xen
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10356/84989-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10220/42045en
dc.description.abstractThe right hemisphere of the human brain is known to be involved in processes underlying emotion and social cognition. Clinical neuropsychology investigations and brain lesion studies have linked a number of personality and social disorders to abnormal white matter (WM) integrity in the right hemisphere. Here, we tested the hypothesis that interpersonal competencies are associated with integrity of WM tracts in the right hemisphere of healthy young adults. Thirty-one participants underwent diffusion tensor imaging scanning. Fractional anisotropy was used to quantify water diffusion. After the scanning session, participants completed the Adolescent Interpersonal Competence Questionnaire. Fractional anisotropy was subsequently correlated with Adolescent Interpersonal Competence Questionnaire scores using tract-based spatial statistics. Higher interpersonal competencies are related to higher WM integrity in several major tracts of the right hemisphere, in specific the uncinate fasciculus, the cingulum, the forceps minor, the infero-fronto occipital fasciculus, the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, and the superior longitudinal fasciculus. These results provide the first direct analysis of the neuroanatomical basis of interpersonal competencies and young adult self-reported skills in social contexts.en
dc.format.extent9 p.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Cognitive Neuroscienceen
dc.rights© 2014 Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press (MIT Press). This paper was published in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience and is made available as an electronic reprint (preprint) with permission of Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press (MIT Press). The published version is available at: [http://dx.doi.org/10.1162/jocn_a_00534]. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic or multiple reproduction, distribution to multiple locations via electronic or other means, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper is prohibited and is subject to penalties under law.en
dc.subjectWhite matter (WM) integrityen
dc.subjectYoung adulthooden
dc.titleInterpersonal Competence in Young Adulthood and Right Laterality in White Matteren
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.schoolSchool of Humanities and Social Sciencesen
dc.identifier.doi10.1162/jocn_a_00534en
dc.description.versionPublished versionen
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