Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/86023
Title: Digital problem-based learning in health professions : systematic review and meta-analysis by the digital health education collaboration
Authors: Tudor Car, Lorainne
Kyaw, Bhone Myint
Dunleavy, Gerard
Smart, Neil A.
Semwal, Monika
Rotgans, Jerome Ingmar
Low-Beer, Naomi
Campbell, James
Keywords: Randomized Controlled Trials
Effectiveness
Science::Medicine
Issue Date: 2019
Source: Tudor Car, L., Kyaw, B. M., Dunleavy, G., Smart, N. A., Semwal, M., Rotgans, J. I., . . . Campbell, J. (2019). Digital problem-based learning in health professions : systematic review and meta-analysis by the digital health education collaboration. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 21(2), e12945-. doi:10.2196/12945
Series/Report no.: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Abstract: Background: The use of digital education in problem-based learning, or digital problem-based learning (DPBL), is increasingly employed in health professions education. DPBL includes purely digitally delivered as well as blended problem-based learning, wherein digital and face-to-face learning are combined. Objective: The aim of this review is to evaluate the effectiveness of DPBL in improving health professionals’ knowledge, skills, attitudes, and satisfaction. Methods: We used the gold-standard Cochrane methods to conduct a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We included studies that compared the effectiveness of DPBL with traditional learning methods or other forms of digital education in improving health professionals’ knowledge, skills, attitudes, and satisfaction. Two authors independently screened studies, extracted data, and assessed the risk of bias. We contacted study authors for additional information, if necessary. We used the random-effects model in the meta-analyses. Results: Nine RCTs involving 890 preregistration health professionals were included. Digital technology was mostly employed for presentation of problems. In three studies, PBL was delivered fully online. Digital technology modalities spanned online learning, offline learning, virtual reality, and virtual patients. The control groups consisted of traditional PBL and traditional learning. The pooled analysis of seven studies comparing the effect of DPBL and traditional PBL reported little or no difference in postintervention knowledge outcomes (standardized mean difference [SMD] 0.19, 95% CI 0.00-0.38). The pooled analysis of three studies comparing the effect of DPBL to traditional learning on postintervention knowledge outcomes favored DPBL (SMD 0.67, 95% CI 0.14-1.19). For skill development, the pooled analysis of two studies comparing DPBL to traditional PBL favored DPBL (SMD 0.30, 95% CI 0.07-0.54). Findings on attitudes and satisfaction outcomes were mixed. The included studies mostly had an unclear risk of bias. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that DPBL is as effective as traditional PBL and more effective than traditional learning in improving knowledge. DPBL may be more effective than traditional learning or traditional PBL in improving skills. Further studies should evaluate the use of digital technology for the delivery of other PBL components as well as PBL overall.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/86023
http://hdl.handle.net/10220/49249
ISSN: 1439-4456
DOI: 10.2196/12945
Rights: © 2019 Lorainne Tudor Car, Bhone Myint Kyaw, Gerard Dunleavy, Neil A Smart, Monika Semwal, Jerome I Rotgans, Naomi Low-Beer, James Campbell. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 28.02.2019. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://www.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:LKCMedicine Journal Articles

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