Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/95563
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShyu, J. Bruce H.en
dc.contributor.authorSieh, Kerryen
dc.contributor.authorChen, Yue-Gauen
dc.contributor.authorChuang, Ray Y.en
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yuen
dc.contributor.authorChung, Ling-Hoen
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-28T01:55:02Zen
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-06T19:17:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-28T01:55:02Zen
dc.date.available2019-12-06T19:17:25Z-
dc.date.copyright2008en
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier.citationShyu, J. B. H., Sieh, K., Chen, Y. G., Chuang, R. Y., Wang, Y., & Chung, L. H. (2008). Geomorphology of the southernmost longitudinal valley fault: implications for evolution of the active suture of eastern Taiwan. Tectonics, 27.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10356/95563-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10220/8427en
dc.description.abstractIn order to understand fully the deformational patterns of the Longitudinal Valley fault system, a major structure along the eastern suture of Taiwan, we mapped geomorphic features near the southern end of the Longitudinal Valley, where many well-developed fluvial landforms record deformation along multiple strands of the fault. Our analysis shows that the Longitudinal Valley fault there comprises two major strands. The Luyeh strand, on the west, has predominantly reverse motion. The Peinan strand, on the east, has a significant left-lateral component. Between the two strands, late Quaternary fluvial sediments and surfaces exhibit progressive deformation. The Luyeh strand dies out to the north, where it steps to the east and joins the Peinan strand to become the main strand of the reverse sinistral Longitudinal Valley fault. To the south, the Luyeh strand becomes an E-W striking monocline. This suggests that the reverse motion on the Longitudinal Valley system decreases drastically at that point. The Longitudinal Valley fault system is therefore likely to terminate abruptly there and does not seem to connect to any existing structure further to the south. This abrupt structural change suggests that the development of the Longitudinal Valley suture occurs through discrete structural “jumps,” rather than by a continuous northward maturation.en
dc.format.extent22 p.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTectonicsen
dc.rights© 2008 AGU. This paper was published in Tectonics and is made available as an electronic reprint (preprint) with permission of American Geophysical Union. The paper can be found at: DOI [http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2006TC002060]. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic or multiple reproduction, distribution to multiple locations via electronic or other means, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper is prohibited and is subject to penalties under law.en
dc.subjectDRNTU::Engineering::Civil engineering::Water resourcesen
dc.titleGeomorphology of the southernmost longitudinal valley fault : implications for evolution of the active suture of eastern Taiwanen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2006TC002060en
dc.description.versionPublished versionen
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
item.grantfulltextopen-
Appears in Collections:EOS Journal Articles
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Geomorphology of the Southernmost Longitudinal Valley faultn.pdf61.86 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric

Items in DR-NTU are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.