Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/96540
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dc.contributor.authorLuo, Yuanen
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Baileen
dc.contributor.authorHan, Tianchengen
dc.contributor.authorChen, Zhien
dc.contributor.authorDuan, Yuboen
dc.contributor.authorChu, Chia-Weien
dc.contributor.authorBarbastathis, Georgeen
dc.contributor.authorQiu, Cheng Weien
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-08T03:58:08Zen
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-06T19:32:10Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-08T03:58:08Zen
dc.date.available2019-12-06T19:32:10Z-
dc.date.copyright2013en
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.citationLuo, Y., Zhang, B., Han, T., Chen, Z., Duan, Y., Chu, C. W., et al. (2013). Phase-preserved optical elevator. Optics Express, 21(6), 6650-6657.en
dc.identifier.issn1094-4087en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10356/96540-
dc.description.abstractThe unique superiority of transformation optics devices designed from coordinate transformation is their capability of recovering both ray trajectory and optical path length in light manipulation. However, very few experiments have been done so far to verify this dual-recovery property from viewpoints of both ray trajectory and optical path length simultaneously. The experimental difficulties arise from the fact that most previous optical transformation optics devices only work at the nano-scale; the lack of intercomparison between data from both optical path length and ray trajectory measurement in these experiments obscured the fact that the ray path was subject to a subwavelength lateral shift that was otherwise not easily perceivable and, instead, was pointed out theoretically [B. Zhang et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 233903 (2010)]. Here, we use a simple macroscopic transformation optics device of phase-preserved optical elevator, which is a typical birefringent optical phenomenon that can virtually lift an optical image by a macroscopic distance, to demonstrate decisively the unique optical path length preservation property of transformation optics. The recovery of ray trajectory is first determined with no lateral shift in the reflected ray. The phase preservation is then verified with incoherent white-light interferometry without ambiguity and phase unwrapping.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOptics expressen
dc.rights© 2013 Optical Society of America. This paper was published in Optics Express and is made available as an electronic reprint (preprint) with permission of Optical Society of America. The paper can be found at the following official DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.21.006650. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic or multiple reproduction, distribution to multiple locations via electronic or other means, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper is prohibited and is subject to penalties under law.en
dc.subjectDRNTU::Science::Physics::Optics and lighten
dc.titlePhase-preserved optical elevatoren
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.schoolSchool of Physical and Mathematical Sciencesen
dc.identifier.doi10.1364/OE.21.006650en
dc.description.versionPublished versionen
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