Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/98506
Title: Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse) : a potential vector of Zika virus in Singapore
Authors: Wong, Pei-Sze Jeslyn.
Li, Mei-zhi Irene.
Chong, Chee-Seng.
Ng, Lee-Ching.
Tan, Cheong-Huat.
Keywords: DRNTU::Science::Biological sciences::Microbiology::Virology
Issue Date: 2013
Source: Wong, P.-S. J., Li, M.-z. I., Chong, C.-S., Ng, L.-C., & Tan, C.-H. (2013). Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse) : a potential vector of Zika virus in Singapore. PLoS neglected tropical diseases, 7(8), e2348-.
Series/Report no.: PLoS neglected tropical diseases
Abstract: Background: Zika virus (ZIKV) is a little known arbovirus until it caused a major outbreak in the Pacific Island of Yap in 2007. Although the virus has a wide geographic distribution, most of the known vectors are sylvatic Aedes mosquitoes from Africa where the virus was first isolated. Presently, Ae. aegypti is the only known vector to transmit the virus outside the African continent, though Ae. albopictus has long been a suspected vector. Currently, Ae. albopictus has been shown capable of transmitting more than 20 arboviruses and its notoriety as an important vector came to light during the recent chikungunya pandemic. The vulnerability of Singapore to emerging infectious arboviruses has stimulated our interest to determine the competence of local Ae. albopictus to transmit ZIKV. Methodology/Principal Findings: To determine the competence of Ae. albopictus to ZIKV, we orally infected local mosquito strains to a Ugandan strain virus. Fully engorged mosquitoes were maintained in an environmental chamber set at 29°C and 80–85%RH. Twelve mosquitoes were then sampled daily from day one to seven and on day 10 and 14 post infection (pi). Zika virus titre in the midgut and salivary glands of each mosquito were determined using tissue culture infectious dose50 assay, while transmissibility of the virus was determined by detecting viral antigen in the mosquito saliva by qRT-PCR. High dissemination and transmission rate of ZIKV were observed. By day 7-pi, all mosquitoes have disseminated infection and 73% of these mosquitoes have ZIKV in their saliva. By day 10-pi, all mosquitoes were potentially infectious. Conclusions/Significance: The study highlighted the potential of Ae. albopictus to transmit ZIKV and the possibility that the virus could be established locally. Nonetheless, the threat of ZIKV can be mitigated by existing dengue and chikungunya control program being implemented in Singapore.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/98506
http://hdl.handle.net/10220/18420
ISSN: 1935-2735
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0002348
Rights: © 2013 The Authors. This paper was published in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases and is made available as an electronic reprint (preprint) with permission of the authors. The paper can be found at the following official DOI: [http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0002348]. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic or multiple reproduction, distribution to multiple locations via electronic or other means, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper is prohibited and is subject to penalties under law.
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
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